The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd

The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk KiddSue Monk Kidd’s premise is an arresting one: in America’s Deep South at the start of the 19th century, one child is presented to another child as an 11th birthday present, wrapped in a bow.

An unlikely friendship is born between Sarah Grimké and her slave, Hetty ‘Handful’ Grimké.

The tale which follows is based surprisingly closely on a true story.

The Grimké sisters were trailblazing abolitionists (and strident feminists), born into the upper echelons of Charleston slave-owning society.

Sue Monk Kidd’s main departure from history is that Handful’s real life counterpart died before she reached adulthood.

If you’re the sort of person who wept buckets during 12 Years a Slave, this one may not be for you.

It made me cry more than once, and there’s a healthy dollop of white guilt in there, as there most certainly should be.

Although I loved it right from the start, there was a lull in the action towards the middle, during which I wasn’t sure where the story was heading. You must push through this. Because afterwards, the story really comes into its own.

A gripping and emotional read, which nimbly toes the line between uplifting and realistic. Quite a feat, when the subject is the US slave trade.

The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd

2 responses to “The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s